Without a doubt, before, a mini trampoline or urba
Without a doubt, before, a mini trampoline or urban rebounder was only for children

Yes, before, a mini trampoline or urban rebounder was only for children. Today, because of the many benefits that it brings to one’s health, many adults consider it already as one of their favorite exercises.

When you exercise in a mini trampoline or rebounder, your bloodstream flow will be improved and your power will be increased. Rebounding at the mini trampoline can also help in cutting down your extra fat and in preserving your coronary heart healthy. Yet, aside from enhancing your overall fitness, it can also be stress-free and fun to have your mini trampoline exercise. What is even excellent with this is that, you need not have a special skill to perform the exercise. Thus, anyone can surely appreciate the mini trampoline. You can find a evaluation chart at our site trampoline reviews.

One can try to use the trampoline even 10 minutes each day. And, eventually, you can try rebounding on it up to 20 to 30 minutes.

Since a rebounder is just little, it is just fine to put it in a corner of your home so you can do your exercise anytime you want. Of program, a mini trampoline is also light, hence, this exercise gear is just perfect to men and women with less muscle tone or to senior citizens at your home. This can be easily transferred from one spot to another devoid of any hassle. You do not need other special equipment for you to use it, just the rebounder itself. Please visit wikipedia for more information about trampoline stunts.

Now, where can you buy this tools? You do not need to worry as this gear is widely available. In fact, you can find it at the closest fitness tools store in your location. With regards to the price tag, this mini trampoline is one of the most affordable tools that you can find here. It is recommended that you buy the foldable model so you can carry it easily, especially when you always travel.

Again, when you want to stay healthy and have fun, it is high time for you to grab a mini trampoline or a rebounder. This is really worth the price tag.

This is an article that you should read trampoline reviews to find out more information.

itsalwayssunny:

Dennis: HOW COULD YOU DO THIS? Charlie: Oh, well, excuse me for being the most terrible man on the planet! I’m a terrible man! Dennis: What are you doing!? What is that!? We thought you were dying, Charlie! Charlie: Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. Who’s we? Dennis: Me and Mac and Sweet Dee. Charlie: Oh, great! Great. I told you not to tell anyone. Now I’m gonna have to go into remission or something so they don’t think I was lying. Dennis: YOU WERE LYING!!! Charlie: YEAH, I LIED TO YOU, alright!? Look. The girl— she wears a Lance Armstrong bracelet. Okay? So I tell you that I have cancer, right? Then you’re gonna tell her, she’s gonna feel sorry for me, we’re gonna start dating, and THAT’S THE WAY THAT LIFE WORKS, MAN!!! Dennis: THAT WAS A HORRIBLE THING TO DO!! Charlie: Well, I’m a bad guy then. Dennis: You are a bad guy! You lied to us. Charlie: Alright, look at this. Sometimes you gotta crack a few eggs to make an omelet. Dennis: You gotta crack a couple of eggs to make an omelet? Charlie: You gotta crack an egg. Dennis: So you’re throwing down life lessons now? Charlie: I’m throwin’ down eggs! Dennis: Class is in session! The teacher’s teachin’ class now! Charlie: I’m crackin’ eggs of wisdom! Dennis: Is that what you’re doin’? Let me crack one more egg for you and throw it in the omelet. Charlie: You got an egg? Dennis: The waitress doesn’t even like you. We had to pay her $250 to have sex with you! Charlie: A-ha! Because— nnnm. Sex?? We didn’t have sex! … *sigh*

itsalwayssunny:

Dennis: HOW COULD YOU DO THIS?
Charlie: Oh, well, excuse me for being the most terrible man on the planet! I’m a terrible man!
Dennis: What are you doing!? What is that!? We thought you were dying, Charlie!
Charlie: Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. Who’s we?
Dennis: Me and Mac and Sweet Dee.
Charlie: Oh, great! Great. I told you not to tell anyone. Now I’m gonna have to go into remission or something so they don’t think I was lying.
Dennis: YOU WERE LYING!!!
Charlie: YEAH, I LIED TO YOU, alright!? Look. The girl— she wears a Lance Armstrong bracelet. Okay? So I tell you that I have cancer, right? Then you’re gonna tell her, she’s gonna feel sorry for me, we’re gonna start dating, and THAT’S THE WAY THAT LIFE WORKS, MAN!!!
Dennis: THAT WAS A HORRIBLE THING TO DO!!
Charlie: Well, I’m a bad guy then.
Dennis: You are a bad guy! You lied to us.
Charlie: Alright, look at this. Sometimes you gotta crack a few eggs to make an omelet.
Dennis: You gotta crack a couple of eggs to make an omelet?
Charlie: You gotta crack an egg.
Dennis: So you’re throwing down life lessons now?
Charlie: I’m throwin’ down eggs!
Dennis: Class is in session! The teacher’s teachin’ class now!
Charlie: I’m crackin’ eggs of wisdom!
Dennis: Is that what you’re doin’? Let me crack one more egg for you and throw it in the omelet.
Charlie: You got an egg?
Dennis: The waitress doesn’t even like you. We had to pay her $250 to have sex with you!
Charlie: A-ha! Because— nnnm. Sex?? We didn’t have sex! … *sigh*

dateable:

Billy (Scott Patterson) → The Sponge
After tracking down the last case of Today contraceptive sponges in a 25-block radius, Elaine is forced to grill Billy on several points to ensure he’s “sponge-worthy.”

Elaine: You gonna do something about your sideburns?
Billy: Yeah, I told you. I’m gonna trim my sideburns.

dateable:

Billy (Scott Patterson) → The Sponge

After tracking down the last case of Today contraceptive sponges in a 25-block radius, Elaine is forced to grill Billy on several points to ensure he’s “sponge-worthy.”

Elaine: You gonna do something about your sideburns?

Billy: Yeah, I told you. I’m gonna trim my sideburns.

imremembering:

Show & Tell: Halloween Parade
Christmas and Easter came early for tchotchkelove on this Halloween.

imremembering:

Show & Tell: Halloween Parade

Christmas and Easter came early for tchotchkelove on this Halloween.

fuckyeahleightonmeester:

meesters:

Blair: Do you wanna talk? Or …Chuck: No talking.


(via meestersss)

fuckyeahleightonmeester:

meesters:

Blair: Do you wanna talk? Or …
Chuck: No talking.

(via meestersss)

notesonobjects:

iPod (scroll wheel) 5GB, Vintage
This is the first generation iPod, launched in 2001. These models have a scroll wheel that physically turns. Originally Mac-only with Firewire connectivity, the iPod would retail for $399 for the 5GB flavor. I got mine off eBay, a mint unit with mint headphones, sealed wall plug, an extra wall plug and two Firewire cables for $25. I even got lucky to score a second unit for $20. Unfortunately I was unable to get another one for so little since. These things are rare! Seldom they pop on eBay in various condition and run for as high as $599.
The original iPod is maybe one of the most beautiful and hip objects in my possession.
$20 - $599 | buy

notesonobjects:

iPod (scroll wheel) 5GB, Vintage

This is the first generation iPod, launched in 2001. These models have a scroll wheel that physically turns. Originally Mac-only with Firewire connectivity, the iPod would retail for $399 for the 5GB flavor. I got mine off eBay, a mint unit with mint headphones, sealed wall plug, an extra wall plug and two Firewire cables for $25. I even got lucky to score a second unit for $20. Unfortunately I was unable to get another one for so little since. These things are rare! Seldom they pop on eBay in various condition and run for as high as $599.

The original iPod is maybe one of the most beautiful and hip objects in my possession.

$20 - $599 | buy

The Ateneo Blue and Lady Tankers both earned second place overall in the 72nd UAAP Swimming tournament held at the Trace Aquatic Complex in Los Baños, Laguna.

For the Blue Tankers, it was a great leap forward from their fourth place finish last season, while the Lady Tankers took a step back…

tedx:

I’ve been fascinated by TED and TEDx for years, but have had one frustration: TEDxKids events often have super-clever adults telling us what eight year olds need, but rarely do we hear eight year olds - normal, unprimed, raw, and en masse - giving their take on the planet they will inherit.

Cue TEDxKids@Sunderland, in Sunderland, a north-east England city where my team had been working with teachers and young students in a suburb school on a project whose initial goals were simple: raise the confidence and ability of students in speaking, and help develop new teacher skills in the use of technology for learning.

The biggest challenge with any form of pueblo speaking in school is the authenticity of learning (or, rather, the lack of it). When it comes to our youngest children learning to speak, or, rather, give a speech, traditional options in school are limited:

Children nonchalantly turn up with a show and tell, based on what they think they are passionate about: dogs, hamsters, football clubs, TV shows, holidays. They give a talk to 29 other people who really don’t care: few eight year olds’ talks pass the “so what?” test that we might ask before accepting to do a TEDx Talk. Above all, the sense of audience is limited to a limited number of people in the room, the sense of occasion is non-existent, and the level of teacher involvement in the preparation of larger occasions too often begins to tip the balance away from that of which students alone would be capable.

After having helped develop richer language through the use of everything from fairytales to video games, we began to hothouse ideas with the students that would be of interest not just to their peers, but also to an invited audience of parents, business people and local dignitaries. Their ideas really did have to pass the “so what?” test.

The students took control of everything in relation to the TEDx event: they arranged the venue, pulled together the slides stack, the branding and the large, cardboard cutout TEDx for their stage. They wrote their talks without teachers’ meddling, and the teachers, who had begun the journey sceptical that seven and eight year olds could possibly pull off something of this calibre, had to work hard to get out of the students’ way. Sue, working with the youngest children, wrote this on her learning log after the event:

“It’s the morning after the day before and I still feel elated. The whole day flowed through my dreams riding the wave of that feel-good factor that started as the cameras rolled and the first child stood up to conquer the world. Well that’s what it felt like. It is hard to imagine that just a few months ago I was feeling that this was impossible. Too much for Year 3. How could all the complex abilities of all my class be served equally?

“For once it is thrilling to be so very wrong. We as teachers always feel that it is us in the driving seat. That we are imparting all our hard earned knowledge. That we set the bar and the childrens job is to work hard enough to reach it. But yesterday, in fact this whole experience has proved the point. We need to let go of the reins.

“Because it has been the children that have challenged me to be a better teacher. They have raised the bar every day of this project and it has been my job to keep up. I feel humbled by what my kids achieved and can’t wait till after the holidays when I can get back in the class and let them know how very proud I am of them. How proud I am to have been part of their growth as individuals. Proud to have shared this short , yet immense journey.”

We chose with care some of those past TED and TEDx speakers whose message and means were meaningful to the youngsters: David Gallo and his underwater creatures, Jamie Oliver and his quest to stem junk food in US schools, Gever Tulley and his magical Tinkering School, Bobby McFerrin and his definition of “intuitive”. We looked at marshmallow experiments (their favourite talks) and explored the science of juggling.

By having these world class mentors on tap, online, we moved from a situation where initially, out of sixty children, only two wanted to speak in front of their classmates about anything, to a situation where none wanted to miss out on their chance to speak to 200 strangers.

We truly gave over every element of this TEDx to the kids, which means the videos will take a little longer to spring to life online, but you will learn why slugs need slime, and that fake vomit can be created. You’ll see an eight year old make a mockery of England’s high stakes assessment in mathematics - by passing it, without revision, and getting the same grade as his sixteen year old cousin. You’ll hear from one child who’s had cancer why it is so important we care for the dying as well as those who can now live. You’ll find out what animals dream about, and a whole lot more.

TEDxKids - when it’s done by kids, for kids - acts as an incredibly powerful lens through which to raise the ambition of our young people beyond the artificial pseudo-success labels and assessments on which too many believe their future lies. And I’m proud to have been one of the few adult collaborators to this band of fearless, troublesome eight year olds.

Written by Ewan McIntosh, TEDxKids@Sutherland

fuckyeahemmawatson:

New photo-shoot by Andrea Carter-Bowman

fuckyeahemmawatson:

New photo-shoot by Andrea Carter-Bowman